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Rúni Rasmussen


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Valdsbýti

English Summary
This article describes the historical and the philosophical origin of the separation
of powers doctrine. From ancient political thoughts on mixed constitutions to the
political philosophies of John Locke and Charles de Montesquieu, the separation
of powers doctrine is traced up to our day. The two great models, the parliamentary
and presidential systems are compared and discussed. It is underlined that there
is a fundamental difference between the parliamentary and presidential systems in
relation to separation of powers. There is no separation of powers between the legislative
and the executive branch in a parliamentary government system. The Faroese
government system is described and analyzed in this context. The author concludes
that there is no real separation of powers between the legislative and the executive
branch in the Faroese system even though the Frame of Government proclaims the
separation between the legislative, the executive and the judicial branch. This has
to be taken into account in the Faroese constitutional process so that lessons are
learned from history and the study of other government systems becomes part of
creating a good and enduring constitution for the Faroe Islands.